Communication and nurse patient relationship

3 Principles of Effective Nurse-Patient Communication - Minority Nurse

communication and nurse patient relationship

Nurse-Patient Relationship in Peplau Theory Interpersonal Relations How effective communication relates with patients and nurses. Nurse-patient communication is anchored by strong interpersonal relationships. Meaningful relationships will allow nurses to carry out their. The nurse–client relationship is an interaction aimed to enhance the well-being of a "client," This includes withholding communication from a client because it is considered to be an example of neglect. It is the nurse's job to be aware of signs.

The decoding of the messages is based on individual factors and subjective perceptions. This fact, in conjunction with the process of feedback makes communication. We interpret something that we heard not according to what the sender actually said but according to our own code Particular attention should be given by the caregivers to use technical terms and medical terminology during their contact with the ill, because it is often found that the patient ascribes different interpretations to what he hears or even more cannot understand what is meant exactly, mainly by the therapist, thus increasing mental stress, a fact which makes it more difficult to communicate with the patient Communication happens without words.

It is an ongoing process. This non-verbal communication is expressed by facial expressions, gestures, posture and physical barriers such as distance from the interlocutor It is important that there is an agreement between verbal and nonverbal communication. Particularly under stressful conditions where it is difficult to see the changes in the non-verbal messages of the patients with whom we mostly communicate Moreover, each patient has his own specific characteristics that influence not only behavior in the process of communication, but also if and how to cooperate with nursing services and how they will undertake self-management of health Listening is important in communication.

It is responsible nursing practice and requires concentration of attention and mobilization of all the senses for the perception of verbal and non-verbal messages emitted by each patient. Good personal relationships are described as the ability of the nurse to ask questions with kindness and provide information in a way that does not scare, that demonstrates interest, creates feelings of acceptance, trust and a harmonious relationship, especially in modern multicultural society The therapeutic relationship is an important prerequisite to effective communication between health professionals and patients in order not only to transmit information, but also to effectively address mental processes which are activated by it.

The communication between health professionals and patients include the ability to express sincere concern for the care of the patient and the patient becomes a partaker of this interest 9.

This will happen if the conversation is held in appropriate conditions. Even though it seems obvious, it should be noted that courtesy and kindness on part of the nurse is required 4 A key element is the need for a peaceful environment with no external distractions, which will ensure appropriate confidentiality of the dialogue.

Frequently we see the phenomenon of serious discussions taking place in the middle of the corridor of the outpatient department or the nursing department, clinic, or in some office of the hospital, in which third parties unrelated to the care of the individual patient are coming in and out In such an environment the patients are ashamed to express themselves freely Unfortunately, the concept of privacy is pretty much unknown to the Greek hospital system.

Communication in Nursing Practice

Skilled nursing operations for the patients are made in chambers without screens or in hallways, in front of others. Patients and visitors of hospitals move without restriction in all the areas of the nursing and clinical departments. However, it is up to us to teach our colleagues and especially the new nurses and their patients setting the right example, in order for things to slowly change for the better Even more than the comfort of space, communication with the patient requires ample time.

Each patient has his own way and pace to reveal his problem, but it takes some time to get to know the nurses and feel the confidence necessary to face them.

3 Principles of Effective Nurse-Patient Communication

The patient should have the feeling that the time-whether it is five minutes or an hour-is entirely his. The patient who has the undivided attention of the nurse reveals his problem sooner, with the satisfaction that the nurse has listened and observed him The language he uses for this purpose is very important.

Often the patient is bombarded with big words with little or no significance for him Once again the nurse may be directed to the ill in an incomprehensible way. Patients that are ashamed of their ignorance or are hesitant, avoid seeking an explanation, and as a result the consultation is inadequate and does not lead to the right outcome for the patient. The language of communication should therefore be at the level of the listener, who is not able to assess our scientific knowledge, but has to understand what we are telling him Another important requirement for proper and successful communication between nurses and patients is frankness and honesty.

The discussion with the patient should leave no suspicions, doubts and misunderstandings.

Nurse–client relationship

Communication as already stated is bidirectional, but the nurse or other health professional is responsibility for its proper conduct. Moreover, depending on the psychosynthesis it can be more or less calm. Reactions such as anger, disbelief, moaning, aggression and denial of reality are known defence mechanisms, which are recruited to help him adjust to the new situation he is facing 8 The angry patient usually does not have any previous personal differences with health professionals, although they are the direct recipients of his anger.

communication and nurse patient relationship

The latter should understand and accept these mechanisms which serve the underlying anxiety of the patient and to respond with information, awareness and readiness to provide all possible assistance Finally, people differ in their needs for communication. Some expect or require patient listening, without caring much about the answers.

Others want a specific explanation for everything that happens to them. These different needs should be treated accordingly by the nurses, who should be able to detect what each patient wants What of course in any case should be avoided by the caregivers is silence and indifference to the questions of the patient. In the best cases, the patient will leave disappointed and in the worst really indignant with nurses 9.

It is not only based on an innate ability that varies from person to person, but also on the necessary training and experience that one acquires during exercise The need also for education in communication has been recognized worldwide 6. The results of this will be to demonstrate greater understanding among patients with greater benefit to patients and personal satisfaction to nurses in the performance of nursing Good communication also improves the quality of care provided to patients, which is observed in the results.

Additionally, it is considered an inalienable right and a prerequisite for building a genuine and meaningful relationship between patients and nurses and other health professionals So in order for modern Nursing as a service to humans to realize the project, there is a need for dialogue and a good interpersonal climate that develops personally with each sick person, especially in our modern multicultural society.

The best expertise training and continuing education of nurses in matters relating to the proper technique of communication will enable them to respond adequately and humanely to the expectations of patients. Nursing of man as a unique person Nosileftiki. Exploring contextual factors of the nurse-patient relationship: Talking with the patient: Medical Time Northwestern Greece.

Exploring communication skills training in undergraduate nurse education by means of a curriculum. Therefore, in order to help another person, one must consider all these aspects; this means not neglecting the person and strictly just treating the illness.

Caring for patients is beyond the treatment of disease and disability. Background knowledge is the nurse's education, and her life experience. Knowledge of interpersonal and development theory is the knowledge of theories of the sense of self and self influence on others.

The specific theories are: Knowledge of person explains that nurses must take the time to understand the client, and their world; what is meaningful to them, and their history. Knowledge of Health and Illness is the knowledge that the nurse must attain about their client's health issue.

Knowledge of Systems explains that the nurse needs to know about the health-care system so they can help their clients access services. You cannot efficiently use one aspect without the other; they are all connected and work together to create a successful relationship. Nurses assist clients to achieve their health related goals including improving their relationship with others.

communication and nurse patient relationship

The relationship between nurse and client is a powerful healing force by itself. Self-awareness Self-awareness is an internal evaluation of one self and of one's reactions to emotionally charged situations, people and places.

It offers an opportunity to recognize how our attitudes, perceptions, past and present experiences, and relationships frame or distort interactions with others. An example of self-awareness would be acknowledging that showing anger is not a sign of weakness, because there were emotions outside of your control. Nurses need self-awareness in this relationship to be able to relate to the patient's experiences to develop empathy. Attributes such as being genuine, warm and respectful are a few to mention.

An aspect of respect is respecting an individual's culture and ensuring open-mindedness is being incorporated all throughout the relationship up until the termination phase. It is highly beneficial for the client to incorporate their family, as they may be the most effective support system. Revealing your whole self and being genuine with clients will accomplish the desired nurse client relationship.

In addition, the nurse may also reduce distance to demonstrate their desire in being involved, restating and reflecting to validate the nurse's interpretation of the client's message, directing the conversation towards important topics by focusing in on them. Furthermore, being polite and punctual displays respect for the client in addition to remembering to be patient, understanding, also to praise and encourage the client for their attempts to take better care of their health.

One of the non-verbal factors is listening. Listening behaviours are identified as S. R; S-sit squarely in relation to client, O-maintain an open position and do not cross arms or legs, L-lean slightly towards the client, E-maintain reasonable and comfortable eye contact, R-relax. These behaviours are effective for communication skills, and are useful for thinking about how to listen to another person.

Empathy Having the ability to enter the perceptual world of the other person and understanding how they experience the situation is empathy. This is an important therapeutic nurse behaviour essential to convey support, understanding and share experiences.

Patients are expecting a nurse who will show interest, sympathy, and an understanding of their difficulties. When receiving care patients tend to be looking for more than the treatment of their disease or disability, they want to receive psychological consideration. During hard times, clients are looking for a therapeutic relationship that will make their treatment as less challenging as possible.

Many patients are aware that a solution to their problems may not be available but expect to have support through them and that this is what defines a positive or negative experience.

Past experiences can help the clinician can better understand issues in order to provide better intervention and treatment. The goal of the nurse is to develop a body of knowledge that allows them to provide cultural specific care.

This begins with an open mind and accepting attitude. Cultural competence is a viewpoint that increases respect and awareness for patients from cultures different from the nurse's own. Cultural sensitivity is putting aside our own perspective to understand another person's perceptive. Caring and culture are described as being intricately linked. It is important to assess language needs and request for a translation service if needed and provide written material in the patient's language. As well as, trying to mimic the patient's style of communication e.

Another obstacle is stereotyping, a patient's background is often multifaceted encompassing many ethic and cultural traditions. In order to individualize communication and provide culturally sensitive care it is important to understand the complexity of social, ethnic, cultural and economic. This involves overcoming certain attitudes and offering consistent, non-judgemental care to all patients. Accepting the person for who they are regardless of diverse backgrounds and circumstances or differences in morals or beliefs.

By exhibiting these attributes trust can grow between patient and nurse. It includes nurses working with the client to create goals directed at improving their health status. A partnership is formed between nurse and client. The nurse empowers patient and families to get involved in their health.

communication and nurse patient relationship

To make this process successful the nurse must value, respect and listen to clients as individuals. Focus should be on the feelings, priorities, challenges, and ideas of the patient, with progressive aim of enhancing optimum physical, spiritual, and mental health. It is stated that it is the nurse's job to report abuse of their client to ensure that their client is safe from harm.

Nurses must intervene and report any abusive situations observed that might be seen as violent, threatening, or intended to inflict harm. Nurses must also report any health care provider's behaviors or remarks towards clients that are perceived as romantic, or sexually abusive. Interviews were done with participants from Southern Ontario, ten had been hospitalized for a psychiatric illness and four had experiences with nurses from community-based organizations, but were never hospitalized.

The participants were asked about experiences at different stages of the relationship. The research described two relationships that formed the "bright side" and the "dark side". The "bright" relationship involved nurses who validated clients and their feelings.

For example, one client tested his trust of the nurse by becoming angry with her and revealing his negative thoughts related to the hospitalization. The client stated, "she's trying to be quite nice to me For example, one client stated, "The nurses' general feeling was when someone asks for help, they're being manipulative and attention seeking ". One patient reported, "the nurses all stayed in their central station. They didn't mix with the patients The only interaction you have with them is medication time".

One participant stated, "no one cares. It's just, they don't want to hear it. They don't want to know it; they don't want to listen". These findings bring awareness about the importance of the nurse—client relationship.