Alcoholic fermentation and lactic acid relationship

Fermentation and anaerobic respiration | Cellular respiration (article) | Khan Academy

alcoholic fermentation and lactic acid relationship

Alcohol vs Lactic Acid Fermentation. Fermentation is just one of the two ways in which the body can utilize energy from the food being eaten. When in an anaerobic environment, some cells can use glycolysis and fermentation to keep producing ATP. Lactic acid fermentation happens. Under anaerobic conditions, the absence of oxygen, pyruvic acid can be routed by the organism into one of three pathways: lactic acid fermentation, alcohol.

Fermentation and anaerobic respiration

Sauerkraut literally means, "sour cabbage. So let's think a little bit more about what's going on. So as I mentioned, it's all about taking your pyruvate or pyruvic acid, the way I've drawn it right over here, this is pyruvic acid.

Pyruvic, pyruvic acid, right over here. Because we have our hydrogen proton, if we lose our hydrogen proton, this is the same thing drawn again, but now we don't have the hydrogen proton here, this oxygen kept that electron, and all of the other hydrogens, all the hydrogens here, they are implicit.

So the three hydrogens here, they're implicit on this carbon.

alcoholic fermentation and lactic acid relationship

I'm just drawing it with a different notation. And so this one, where we've lost the proton, we would call this pyruvate. And what we have happening is that the pyruvic acid, or the pyruvate is used to oxidize the NADH, take away a hydride, take away an electron from, actually more than just electron but net, you have the NADH losing electrons. And so if it's losing electrons, it's getting oxidized. And when pyruvic acid does this to the NADH, it gets reduced, it gets reduced, it gets reduced, it gains electrons and, if we're thinking about the acid forms, it would turn into this right over here is lactic acid.

Lactic, lactic, lactic acid. And that's why we call it lactic acid fermentation, 'cause you're taking that pyruvate, if you had oxygen around, or if you knew how to do it, use the oxygen, you might continue on with cellular respiration and use that for energy.

And let's just now get a better appreciation for all of this happens. So the first thing that I want to show you because a lot of times in biology classes, you just learn NAD, NADH, and it just seems like this somewhat abstract molecule.

But this is a picture of it.

Alcohol or ethanol fermentation - Cellular respiration - Biology - Khan Academy

This is nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. And it's kind of a mouthful, but when you break it down, you see these patterns that you see repeatedly in biology.

This is, this right over here is what gives us the nicotinamide. This right over here is our good friend adenine. You have ribose right over here, this is derived from ribose. You have a phosphate group, you have a phosphate group. So, nicotinamide, adenine, you have a nucleotide right over there, you have another nucleotide right over there, so it's nicotine adenine dinucleotide.

So the name makes a lot of sense.

alcoholic fermentation and lactic acid relationship

But I wanted to show this to you to get an appreciation that it's a fairly involved molecule over here. You know sometimes when you just see the letters, NAD, you don't get a full appreciation for it. And it's a coenzyme, and we learned about coenzymes in other videos.

Alcoholic fermentation is used the bread baking.

Lactic acid fermentation

The carbon dioxide produced by alcoholic fermentation cause the bread to rise. Alcoholic fermentation is also used in the production of alcoholic beverages such as wine, beer, whiskey, vodka, and rum.

Similarities Between Lactic Acid and Alcoholic Fermentation Lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation are two types of anaerobic respiration mechanisms. Both lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation are catabolic processes.

Both lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation do not require oxygen. Both lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation occur in the cytosol. Both lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation break down glucose molecules into two pyruvate molecules. Both lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation occur in two steps: Both lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation produce heat. Both lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation produce four molecules of ATP. The net ATP gain is two in both lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation.

The two NADH molecules produced in the glycolysis are used in the second step of both lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation. Both lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation are less efficient in the production of ATP when compared to aerobic respiration. Lactic acid fermentation refers to a metabolic process by which glucose is converted into the metabolite: Alcoholic fermentation refers to a metabolic process by which glucose is converted into ethanol and carbon dioxide. Occurrence Lactic Acid Fermentation: Lactic acid fermentation occurs in Lactobacillus spps, yeast, and muscle cells.

Alcoholic fermentation occurs in yeast and other microorganisms. Products Lactic Acid Fermentation: Image from Purves et al. Anaerobic Pathways Back to Top Under anaerobic conditions, the absence of oxygen, pyruvic acid can be routed by the organism into one of three pathways: Humans cannot ferment alcohol in their own bodies, we lack the genetic information to do so.

Alcoholic Fermentation ( Read ) | Biology | CK Foundation

These biochemical pathways, with their myriad reactions catalyzed by reaction-specific enzymes all under genetic control, are extremely complex. We will only skim the surface at this time and in this course. Alcohol fermentation is the formation of alcohol from sugar.

Yeast, when under anaerobic conditions, convert glucose to pyruvic acid via the glycolysis pathways, then go one step farther, converting pyruvic acid into ethanol, a C-2 compound. Many organisms will also ferment pyruvic acid into, other chemicals, such as lactic acid. Humans ferment lactic acid in muscles where oxygen becomes depleted, resulting in localized anaerobic conditions.

This lactic acid causes the muscle stiffness couch-potatoes feel after beginning exercise programs. The stiffness goes away after a few days since the cessation of strenuous activity allows aerobic conditions to return to the muscle, and the lactic acid can be converted into ATP via the normal aerobic respiration pathways. Fermentation of lactate lactic acid.